Women’s Health – Take Action

Have you struggled with your hormones? If so, you are not alone.

Functional health is a much more personal approach to healthcare. It ensures that each patient is treated according to their specific needs and imbalances individually, rather than treated as a diagnosis.

Aiming to return the body and mind to optimum balance and functionality, functional healthcare can often prove the most preferable route for women to embark upon to solve their health issues.

Functional healthcare can help with things such as:

  • Chronic Fatigue
  • Migraine Headaches
  • Anxiety and Depression
  • Insomnia and Sleep Disorders
  • Digestive Issues
  • Obesity and Weight Management
  • Hormonal Imbalances
  • Menopause
  • PMS (Premenstrual Syndrome)
  • Fertility Problems
  • Postpartum Issues

How Does it Work?

By using all natural methods and personalized care, functional healthcare aims to enable patients to not only cure their ailments but get to the root cause of them as well. Whether it be herbal medicine, nutritional therapy, or stress management, functional medicine techniques can greatly reduce the severity of many health complications and by doing so help to prevent them from progressing further.

Becoming better aware of your health issues and their potential causes, triggers, and treatments is a part of how functional medicine helps you to heal yourself and STAY healed. Getting to know all aspects of your health issue and implementing positive change to avoid them worsening cultivates awareness both in your body and in your mind in order to achieve optimum health.

Boosting hormonal function is vital in overall physical and mental health, Estrogen, in particular, is associated with the proper functioning of the female reproductive system, among many other benefits.

Try these foods for healthy hormones:

  • Seeds: flax seeds and sesame seeds
  • Fruit: apricots, oranges, strawberries, and peaches
  • Vegetables: yams, carrots, alfalfa sprouts, kale, and celery
  • Soy products: tofu, miso soup, soy and yogurt
  • Dark rye bread
  • Legumes: lentils, peas, and pinto beans
  • Olives and olive oil
  • Chickpeas

Including these foods in your diet will help women lower their risk of developing hormonal imbalances!

WANT TO LEARN MORE AND STAY CONNECTED?

Sign up for our 14 Days to Health FREE Video Series here: https://onnalomd.com/14daystohealth/

And click here to join our amazing Facebook Community group:  www.facebook.com/groups/happyhealthcommunity

 

Take The Toxic Out Of Your Cleaning Webinar

Detoxify Your Home

It’s easy to assume that what we buy in the store is safe for us to use. Unfortunately, it’s not so simple. Lurking in your cleaning cabinet, laundry room, or under your sink are nasty chemicals that can wreak havoc on your health and the environment.

It is my goal during this webinar to help bring to your awareness the potential dangers and irritants that you’re breathing in and coming into contact with on a daily basis.

Do you want your kids to be sleeping in a bed every night wrapped in sheets that emit chemical vapors?
Do you want your pets laying on a floor that was cleaned with ingredients that have been proven to cause cancer?
Do you want to be exposed to skin irritants that can cause an array of dermatological issues?

If your answer is ‘no’ to any of these questions, you will benefit from this webinar.

What You’ll Learn

During this webinar, you will learn:
– What the federal guidelines allow in terms of chemicals that are safe for home use, as well as what the process is for a cleaning product to get approved and make its way into a store.
– Some of the most harmful chemicals that could be in your home, and learn about the effects of long-term use.
– The dangers of chemically-created fragrances such as those used in laundry detergent, dish soap, floor cleaners, and other cleaners.
– How toxic cleaning products are affecting the environment.
– What “toxic burden” is and how it is affecting you.

This might seem like a lot of new things to worry about, but fear not! This webinar will wrap up with tips on how to make your home and cleaning products green and eco-friendly, so as to keep your loved ones out of irritants and harmful vapors.

Is your blood sugar affecting your brain? Guide to boosting your cognitive health part 5

Are you worried about blood sugar issues? Maybe your family has a history of blood sugar imbalance? Or you are one that suffers from being “hangry” and having low-energy?

The truth is, that blood sugar balance is really important for your health. Diet and lifestyle are significant contributors to dementia and Alzheimer’s. 

Fortunately there is a growing body of scientific evidence to prove this as well. For example, a study in February 2018 found that high blood sugar levels are associated with cognitive decline.

This was true even in people without diabetes, which suggests that even “high-normal” levels of blood sugar could be problematic.

Pioneering doctors and researchers like Dr. Dale Bredesen, Dr. Terry Wahls, and Dr. David Perlmutter have done important work on revealing the many different dietary and lifestyle mechanisms that contribute to neurological and cognitive disorders.

Photo by Sara Dubler on Unsplash

>>> Click here for the free download to support your best blood sugar. 

Why Blood Sugar Matters

Poor blood sugar regulation is a key contributor to many diseases and disorders. It is essential to maintain a healthy and balanced blood sugar for optimum health. Mismanaged blood sugar literally prevents the healing process. There are many signs and symptoms of poorly balanced blood sugar. Some of these signs are brain fog, low energy, poor sleep, cravings for sugar, worsening of autoimmunity, skin tags, cancer, anger when hungry, and many more. Furthermore, when blood sugar goes up it can promote more cortisol in the body too, which has a corresponding impact on insulin. This leads to another host of issues such as weight gain around the mid section, cancer, heart disease, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and hormone imbalances.

Photo by Sharon McCutcheon on Unsplash

How to Monitor Blood Glucose

Many functional medicine practitioners are starting to recommend the monitoring of blood glucose for all patients, even those without diabetes. This is important because it helps you to give a more comprehensive view of what your blood sugar is on a continual basis. By using a simple glucometer, you too can check your blood sugar at home. The benefit is that it is easy to do on your own and it is readily accessible. Since blood sugar monitoring is one of the most important markers for your cognitive health, this is a wonderful idea for anyone looking to avoid the consequences of dementia and Alzheimers.

Photo by rawpixel on Unsplash

Diabetes and Cognitive Decline

Many research articles are drawing the connections between diabetes and cognitive decline. For example, in the Archives of Neurology there was a study that showed mild cognitive impairment was connected with earlier onset, longer duration, and greater severity of diabetes. Mild cognitive impairment represents noticeable cognitive impairment challenges (ie: I forgot where I put my keys….again), but they do not interfere with everyday tasks. Some people may consider that part of “normal” aging, but it may also be indicative of early onset dementia and Alzheimer’s disease. In addition to cognitive decline, diabetes also increases the likelihood of developing cardiovascular disease and stroke- which can then in turn promote more cognitive issues. It can become a vicious cycle of sorts. Additional studies have shown that type 2 diabetes can have as much as a 1.5- to 2.5-fold increase in the risk of dementia and that even Type 1 diabetes can lead to an 80%  higher likelihood of developing cognitive dysfunction, compared with those without diabetes.

Photo by Anders Nord on Unsplash

Pre-Diabetes and Cognitive Decline

Research is also showing that not only does diabetes have a strong correlation to cognitive decline, but so does pre-diabetes. According to Diabetes Journals, pre-diabetes, poor blood sugar control, and longer duration of the disease were associated with greater late-life cognitive decline. While patients with diabetes were at the most risk for cognitive decline, even patients with pre-diabetes had a cognitive decline at a much high rate than their counterparts with a HbA1c level less than 5.7%. On the bright side, if a patient is managing their pre-diabetes well, then they are doing their part to support positive cognitive health outcomes. For example, a study displayed that careful diabetes management with very well regulated glycemic control during midlife actually had a protective effect against cognitive decline in later years.

Photo by Kate on Unsplash

How to Promote Healthy Blood Sugar

1. Avoid dangerous carbs and sweeteners: These can spike your blood sugar and lead to major imbalances, especially over time. Instead opt for healthy fats and small amounts of high quality proteins.

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2. Eat an anti inflammatory diet. This means avoiding sugars, gluten, dairy, alcohol, excessive amounts of caffeine, and highly processed fats. Stay away from processed foods in general (ie: anything that comes in a package) and focus instead on a wide variety of fruits and vegetables, healthy fats, and high quality meats.

Photo by PHÚC LONG on Unsplash

3. Mange your stress. Life happens, stress happens. The important thing is to manage your stress. You can do meditation, exercise, art, family time, spend time in nature, and a multitude of other positive activities. Find something and make a ritual for what works to destress your day.

Photo by Riccardo Mion on Unsplash

4. Have an exercise routine. Exercise literally helps to manage blood sugar because it helps your muscles to take up more glucose (for energy and tissue repair) plus it also makes cells more responsive to insulin to prevent resistance.

Photo by Geert Pieters on Unsplash

5. Rest with both quality and quantity. We have all heard it before, but sleep heals! Make sure you are getting enough sleep each night 7-11 hours, depending on the individual and also make sure you are not suffering from a sleeping disorder such as sleep apnea. Too little sleep can literally increase your stress hormones as well as your appetite.

Photo by Gregory Pappas on Unsplash

In Summary:

There are so many benefits to keeping your blood sugar balanced. We hope that this information is useful for you on your journey for the best cognitive health. If you’d like personal support in this process please click here to learn more about our Happy Health Brain Longevity Program. Also, be sure to check out our entire series on cognitive health by clicking the links below:

Guide To Boosting Your Cognitive Health Part 1: Nutrition

Guide To Boosting Your Cognitive Health Part 2:  Lifestyle Tips

Guide To Boosting Your Cognitive Health Part 3: Kirtan Kriya

Guide To Boosting Your Cognitive Health Part 4: The Ketogenic Diet

Guide To Boosting Your Cognitive Health Part 5: Is your blood sugar affecting your brain?

PS: You are invited to click here to sign up for our free 14 Days to Health Video Series and to join our Facebook group for personal support: The Happy Health Community. 

>>> Click here for the free download to support your best blood sugar. 

Photo by Florencia Viadana on Unsplash

Resources:

AANDD Journal

Ann Intern Med

Diabetes Journals

Dr. Axe

Living Proof Institute

NCBI

PubMed

Springer

WebMD

 

 

 

 

 

 

Adrenal Fatigue Webinar Recording

Do You Suffer From Chronic Exhaustion?

According to a poll conducted by YouGov, 6 out of 7 Americans report not feeling refreshed upon waking, regardless of the amount of sleep they had.
Out of the Americans who slept 7 to 8 hours a night, 45% expressed feeling tired or fatigued three times a week. 27% of them also shared they wake up tired at least 4 times a week.

54% of Americans that sleep six hours or less each night, also, wake up tired at least 4 times a week as well.

In short, most Americans are tired most of the week, every week!

A Glance At Adrenal Function

The adrenal glands are responsible for the production and secretion of many essential hormones within our bodies, such as cortisol and adrenaline. These hormones facilitate our collective stress response. This reaction is composed of slowing down certain functions, such as digestion, brain activity, and psychological reactions, in order to preserve energy for combating stress.
These hormones also aid in the increase of heart rate and blood pressure to equip the body to fight the apparent danger, which in our modern society is very little immediate “danger” at all.

When this stressed state becomes chronic, our adrenal glands have trouble catching up. This presents many of the common symptoms of Adrenal Fatigue, such as:

Persistent physical and mental fatigue
Difficulty handling stress
Food cravings
Weakened immunity
Depression and anxiety
Weight gain
And much, more more!

Does this sound like you?

During Don’t Let Adrenal Fatigue Impact Your Life, you will finally get the chance to take control of your health by improving your adrenal function, stress response, and more with the expertise of functional medicine!

This is guaranteed to be life-changing and we cannot wait to help people take control of the stress in their life so that the stress does not control them any longer.

 

 

Functional Medicine Webinar Recording

Patient-centered care is what sets functional medicine above all else. This integrative, science-based healthcare approach has been noted as the wave of the future.

Our goal is to share with you an in-depth look into functional medicine, why it’s our preferred treatment method, and how it helps. The Way Of The Future “The doctor of the future will give no medicine, but will instruct his patient in the care of the human frame, in diet and in the cause and prevention of disease.” -Thomas Edison Functional medicine has been a long time coming!

While conventional medicine certainly has a place, functional medicine is better suited for chronic conditions and getting to the root of the cause, not just masking it. The National Institutes of Health defines conventional medicine as “A system in which medical doctors and other healthcare professionals treat symptoms and diseases using drugs, radiation, or surgery.”

The key point is symptom treatment. Functional medicine approaches healthcare more holistically by examining every factor involved including, symptoms, genes, environment, and lifestyle to treat the causes of disease, not just the symptoms.

According to the Institute for Functional Medicine, functional medicine was developed based on the understanding of “the importance of an individualized approach to disease causes based on the evolving research in nutritional science, genomics, and epigenetics.”

 

Guide To Boosting Your Cognitive Health Part 1: Nutrition

If you want to improve your brain health, at any age and in any condition, this article is a must-read for you.

This article is perfect for four types of people:

A) You are starting to notice the first signs of cognitive decline:

  • Confusion
  • Poor motor coordination
  • Loss of short-term or long-term memory
  • Identity confusion
  • Impaired judgment

B) You simply want the best brain health your whole life through.

C) You are supporting a loved one who has started to lose optimal brain function.

D) All of the above.

Whether you yourself are suffering, your loved one is struggling, or you are an advocate of healthy living- you will want to take note of the 16 tips offered here in this guide.

This guide is based on Dr. Bredesen’s #1 Bestseller, The End of Alzheimer’s: The First Program to Prevent and Reverse Cognitive Decline. His substantial work in the field of reversing cognitive decline is instrumental for anyone suffering from this themselves or supporting a loved one going through this process.  

These tips would truly benefit all of us, especially those of you who are trying to find the right protocol to support your brain health.  Stay tuned next week too when we share part 2 of this special series!

1. Fast for at least 12 hours between the end of dinner and the beginning of breakfast.

This allows autophagy to occur, which helps your brain to destroy aggregated proteins and other unwanted accumulated molecules. It is best to break the fast with water with some lemon, as a detoxifying drink. Please note: It is best to work with your functional medicine doctor to ensure your blood sugar levels are in a safe proper range for fasting.

2. Fast for at least 3 hours prior to going to bed.

This helps to prevent insulin from inhibiting melatonin and growth hormone, and thus improves sleep and immune function. 

3. It is key to minimize simple carbohydrates

Such as sugar, sweet treats, bread (white and brown), white rice, white potatoes (OK to eat sweet potatoes and other colored potatoes in small quantities), soft drinks (both regular and diet, since diet alter microbiome), alcohol, candy, cakes, processed foods, and anything else with simple carbohydrates. The goal is to change from carbohydrate metabolism to lipid metabolism.

4. Make most of your diet from items that have a glycemic index lower than 35.

For a list of glycemic indices for food, see: https://www.health.harvard.edu/diseases-and-conditions/glycemic-index-and-glycemic-load-for-100-foods

5. Vegetables should be the largest part of the diet

Especially non-starchy ones. Include both uncooked (salads) and cooked. Include as many colors as possible.

6. Avoid fruit juices, but eat fruits 

The whole fruit includes the fiber or have smoothies with fruit, but do not make the smoothies too sweet —best with some vegetables.

7. Avoid gluten and dairy as much as possible.

It is recommended that you get Cyrex Arrays 2, 3, 4 and 20 to help guide you: Array 2 is to determine if you have leaky gut; Array 3 is to determine if you have gluten sensitivity; and Array 20 is to determine whether you have a leaky blood-brain barrier.

8. Reduce blood sugar

You can do this by including fiber, both soluble and insoluble. Try this recipe to make your own almond milk.

9. Reduce toxins

Try this by including cilantro, cruciferous vegetables (e.g., broccoli, cauliflower, brussels sprouts).

10. Include good fats

Such as avocado, nuts, olive oil, seeds, etc.

11. Avoid processed foods and instead eat whole foods.

12. Meat is a condiment, not a main course.

If you eat it, fine, but don’t eat too much (2 or 3 ounces, 1-5 nights per week), and eat pastured chicken or grass-fed beef. Fish is fine if wild caught, best to avoid high-mercury fish such as tuna, swordfish, and shark (fish with large mouths and long lifespans are worst). “SMASH” fish are best (salmon, mackerel, anchovies, sardines, and herring).

13. Emphasize foods with high nutrient density

Such as kale and romaine lettuce. Each day, try to eat at least 3 helpings of:

  • Dark leafy greens, such as kale, collards, spinach, or chard.
  • Colored vegetables or fruits, such as berries, carrots, or beets.
  • Sulfur-rich vegetables, such as cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, or asparagus.
  • Include aromatic herbs such as cilantro, parsley, basil, or mint.

14. Be aware of the “dirty dozen and clean 15” foods.

The Dirty Dozen are foods highest in pesticides, and therefore important to buy as organic: Click here to learn more: https://www.ewg.org/foodnews/dirty-dozen.php The Clean 15 are foods that are not sprayed as heavily, and therefore relatively safe to buy conventionally (non-organically): Click here to learn more: https://www.ewg.org/foodnews/clean-fifteen.php  See: www.fullyraw.com/dirty-dozen-clean-15

15. For grains, legumes, nuts, and seeds, it is helpful to remove the lectins and phytates

Do this by soaking prior to cooking. https://wholelifestylenutrition.com/health/is-soaking-grains-and-legumes-necessary-and-how-to-properly-soak-and-prepare-them/

16. Incorporate pro-biotics and pre-biotics

Do this after determining that you do not have a leaky gut (Cyrex 2). Pro-biotics help to optimize your microbiome, the bacterial population in your gut. Pro-biotic foods include fermented foods such as sauerkraut, kimchi, kombucha, dairy- free yogurt, tempeh, miso, kefir, and coconut water. Pre-biotics help to support the bacteria of the microbiome. Pre-biotic foods include jicama, chicory, Jerusalem artichoke, and others. 

In Summary

There are so many benefits to having the proper nutrition. We hope that this information is useful for you on your journey for the best cognitive health. If you’d like personal support in this process please click here to learn more about our Happy Health Brain Longevity Program. Also, be sure to check out our entire series on cognitive health by clicking the links below:

Guide To Boosting Your Cognitive Health Part 1: Nutrition

Guide To Boosting Your Cognitive Health Part 2:  Lifestyle Tips

Guide To Boosting Your Cognitive Health Part 3: Kirtan Kriya

Guide To Boosting Your Cognitive Health Part 4: The Ketogenic Diet

Guide To Boosting Your Cognitive Health Part 5: Is your blood sugar affecting your brain?

 

PS: You are invited to click here to sign up for our free 14 Days to Health Video Series and to join our Facebook group for personal support: The Happy Health Community. 

 

Tune in next week when we share Guide To Boosting Your Cognitive Health Part 2: Lifestyle

Image result for facebook group

RESOURCES:

Book: The End of Alzheimer’s: The First Program to Prevent and Reverse Cognitive Decline

by Dale Bredesen, MD

Image result for end of alzheimer's book

Golden Milk: A recipe for healing inflammation

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Turmeric has been used for many years to fight depression, aches and pains, inflammation, degenerative brain disorders, heart disease, and preventing cancer, and common colds.  

You can make it with dairy free milk.  It is important to cook in an oil in order to release the medicinal benefits of turmeric.  To get the full anti-inflammatory benefits, drink it  first thing in the morning and before bed, and avoid eating for another 30 minutes after.  This recipe allows you to make your Golden Milk in batches.

Prep Time: 5 minutes             Cook Time: 10 minutes

Ingredients for the Golden paste:

  • ½ cup of turmeric powder
  • 1 cup of water

Directions for the Golden paste:

  1. Cook the ingredients at low – medium heat for about 5-10 minutes, until it has a “toothpaste” consistency. Store in a glass jar in the fridge for up to three weeks.

Ingredients for the Golden milk:

  • 1 tablespoon of golden paste
  • 2 cups of dairy free milk  made from coconut, almond, soy, rice, hemp
  • 1 teaspoon of olive oil or coconut oil
  • 1 pinch of black pepper
  • optional: pinch of cinnamon, or 1 tsp of honey

Directions for the Golden Milk:

  1. Mix 1 tablespoon of Golden paste with the milk, oil, blackpepper and optional sweetener.
  2. Heat in small pot SLOWLY while stirring until well.
  3. Ready to serve.